Life in Poetry

I am Poet, Author and Speaker. I thrive on exploring the interior and exterior world. I am constantly on the lookout for for examples of beauty and truth. Here are a few of the visual images I have found.

People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don’t find myself saying, “Soften the orange a bit on the right hand corner.” I don’t try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds.

—Carl R. Rogers (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

True love, like any other strong and addicting drug, is boring—once the tale of encounter and discovery is told, kisses quickly grow stale and caresses tiresome…except, of course, to those who share the kisses, who give and take the caresses while every sound and color of the world seems to deepen and brighten around them. As with any other strong drug, true first love is really only interesting to those who have become its prisoners.
 And, as is true of any other strong and addicting drug, true first love is dangerous.

Stephen King, Wizard and Glass (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

People aren’t ignoring you. They are busy with their lives. And the way to stop feeling ignored is to get busy with yours.

—Robert Brault (via creatingaquietmind)

People who lack the clarity, courage, or determination to follow their own dreams will often find ways to discourage yours. When you change for the better, the people around you will be inspired to change also….but only after doing their best to make you stop. Live your truth and don’t EVER stop.

Passion. It lies in all of us. Sleeping… waiting… and though unwanted, unbidden, it will stir… open its jaws and howl. It speaks to us… guides us. Passion rules us all. And we obey. What other choice do we have? Passion is the source of our finest moments. The joy of love… the clarity of hatred… the ecstasy of grief. It hurts sometimes more than we can bear. If we could live without passion, maybe we’d know some kind of peace. But we would be hollow. Empty rooms, shuttered and dank. Without passion, we’d be truly dead.

You differ from a great man in only one respect: the great man was once a very little man, but he developed one important quality: he recognized the smallness and narrowness of his thoughts and actions. Under the pressure of some task that meant a great deal to him, he learned to see how his smallness, his pettiness endangered his happiness. In other words, a great man knows when and in what way he is a little man. A little man does not know he is little and is afraid to know. He hides his pettiness and narrowness behind illusions of strength and greatness, someone else’s strength and greatness. He’s proud of his great generals but not of himself. He admires an idea he has not had, not one he has had. The less he understands something, the more firmly he believes in it. And the better he understands an idea, the less he believes in it.

—Wilhelm Reich, Listen, Little Man! (via fy-perspectives)

(via wordsnquotes)

parabola-magazine:

"Spiritual practice is a direct experience. When we follow our breath in the Zen tradition, or repeat the names of God in Islam, or kindle the Sabbath candles and welcome the Shekinah on Shabbat, or offer the light of a butter lamp to Mata Durga, we are harnessing timeless technologies precisely engineered to open the heart and transform consciousness. Practice knocks on the door of the soul and it opens to the presence of the sacred. It shifts us from the intellectual realms of theology into the embodied space of spirit as it pours into and animates all that is."
–Mirabai Starr, author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing a tradition and what it brings. From our Fall Issue on Spiritual Practice. Read the entire interview here.
Art Credit: Albert Anker, Swiss Painter (1831-1910), “Girl, Peeling Potatoes.”

parabola-magazine:

"Spiritual practice is a direct experience. When we follow our breath in the Zen tradition, or repeat the names of God in Islam, or kindle the Sabbath candles and welcome the Shekinah on Shabbat, or offer the light of a butter lamp to Mata Durga, we are harnessing timeless technologies precisely engineered to open the heart and transform consciousness. Practice knocks on the door of the soul and it opens to the presence of the sacred. It shifts us from the intellectual realms of theology into the embodied space of spirit as it pours into and animates all that is."

Mirabai Starr, author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing a tradition and what it brings. From our Fall Issue on Spiritual Practice. Read the entire interview here.

Art Credit: Albert Anker, Swiss Painter (1831-1910), “Girl, Peeling Potatoes.”

cablestotheace:

theparisreview:

“I think sometimes about old painters—they get so simple in their means. Just so plain and simple. Because they know they haven’t got time. One is aware of this as one gets older. You can’t waste time.”
Happy eighty-fifth birthday, Ursula K. Le Guin! Read her 2013 Art of Fiction interview.

Another reason Stumptown (aka: PDX) continues to rule.

cablestotheace:

theparisreview:

“I think sometimes about old painters—they get so simple in their means. Just so plain and simple. Because they know they haven’t got time. One is aware of this as one gets older. You can’t waste time.”

Happy eighty-fifth birthday, Ursula K. Le Guin! Read her 2013 Art of Fiction interview.

Another reason Stumptown (aka: PDX) continues to rule.

Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.